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The Oeshiki ceremony celebrates how Nichiren Daishonin, upon his entry into nirvana, manifested the duality of extinction and non-extinction as the True Buddha, thus revealing his constant life in the three existences.* This ceremony is held each October at local Buddhist temples of Nichiren Shoshu.

Founder of Nichiren Shoshu Buddhism

Nichiren Daishonin is the founder of Nichiren Shoshu. He passed away on October 13, 1282. The Oeshiki Ceremony is the celebration of the eternal life of Nichiren Daishonin. The Head Temple Taiseki-ji as well as local temples, like Myosenji Temple, decorate the altar with colorful paper cherry blossoms.

At the core of Buddhist doctrine is the revelation of the concept of oneness. The fact that at the time of the Daishonin’s death there was an earthquake as the cherry trees bloomed out of season teaches us the Buddhist concept of oneness. The oneness of the common mortal and Buddha. The oneness of life and its environment, the oneness of body and mind and the oneness of death and birth cannot be separated from each other. Therefore, at the moment of the True Buddha’s physical death, the earth shook in farewell, but the cherry trees bloomed out of season in welcome. Thus, the Daishonin’s passing reveals the principle of oneness.

*Excerpted from Nichiren Shoshu Monthly, October, 2015, “The Person and The Law” pp.21-22.

The altar in which the Gohonzon (object of worship) is enshrined is called the butsudan. Butsugu is a general term for the Buddhist accessories used to make offerings to the Gohonzon in front of the butsudan. The three basic accessories are the white candle, the incense burner and the evergreen vase. The three together are called “mitsugusoku” or the three accessories.

Incense, candles and evergreens, each have a significant meaning in Buddhism:

  • Incense represents the property of the Law, the truth to which the Buddha is enlightened.
  • White candle represents the property of wisdom. This enables the Buddha to see the truth.
  • Evergreens represent the physical property of the Buddha’s life, the property of compassionate action.

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, please check our calendar for our Introductory Series on Buddhism and visit our Temple soon!

Disparaging others is not in our best interest. Hate for others creates negative karma for you. Talking badly of others, ridiculing others are behaviors we can easily engage in when we circle around the lower six worlds of hell, hunger, animality, anger, humanity, and rapture.

It’s easy to be jealous, to be angry, to feel superior, to bear grudges, to manipulate, to be arrogant, to be arbitrary, to be self-satisfied. However, Buddhism teaches all living beings have a Buddha nature that can manifest enlightenment. It’s in our best interest to take feelings of hate or anger or arrogance and turn them into positive action. Buddhism teaches you how to do that.

Transcend the Lower Six Paths

Sunday, October 6th, Myosenji Temple will host a lecture on the Ten Worlds by our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe. He will explain how to awaken your Buddha nature, transcend the six lower paths and improve relationships with others and yourself.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Saturday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

Buddhism does not teach guilt, regrets or remorse. Buddhism teaches Karma.

What you say matters. What you think matters. What you do matters. Your thoughts, words and deeds create your Karma. Buddhism’s teaches that unhappiness begins with illusion, which is based on earthly desire. Through the thoughts and actions that result from illusion, we create karma, and as a result of that karma, we experience suffering.

The twelve-linked chain of causation is an explanation of how this three-tiered causal relationship (illusion, karma and suffering) applies to the reality of our lives. The eighth clause in the twelve-linked chain is Ai (want). It refers to awareness of feelings of fierce craving that result from pain and pleasure, as when a thirsty person craves water. When pain is sensed, one experiences a strong craving to try to avoid the hateful feeling, and when pleasure is felt, the experience creates an intense desire to try to maintain the sensation. The ninth clause is Shu (taking). It refers to the act of physically or verbally choosing to take or reject something. While the previous clause referred to the heart’s burning desires of love and hatred, “taking” refers to real actions that are taken in response to such emotions. Plundering what one wants, and getting rid of, wounding or killing what one hates, are examples of such actual conduct.*

Karma Lecture – Sunday, Sept 29th

Visit Myosenji Temple this Sunday, September 29th, to hear our Chief Priest explain how your Karma works and how you can eradicate your negative karma and gain absolute happiness in this lifetime.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public and free.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 entrance on Burnett Ave

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Sunday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

*Excerpted: Nichiren Shoshu Monthly Magazine, The Twelve-linked Chain of Causation.

SUNDAY, September 22nd at Myosenji Buddhist Temple

and/or

SATURDAY, September 21st in Baltimore