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Learn about Buddhism and chant Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo at our Buddhist Temple.

Even if one does not study the sutra, chanting the Daimoku* alone is a tremendous good cause. [The Lotus Sutra states that] evil people, women, those of the worlds of animality and hell—those of all the ten worlds—will be able to attain enlightenment. This is analogous to a rock taken from the bottom of a river possessing the ability to ignite a fire, or a lamp having the ability to illuminate a place that has been dark for one hundred and ten million years. Such mysterious phenomena are found even in trivial matters of society, not to mention the mystic power of the Law of Buddhism.**
                    written by Nichiren Daishonin, 13th century Japan

Once we chant Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, this one phrase enables the Buddha nature within the lives of the people, who inhabit the ten worlds, to be called up and revealed. Thus, all living beings are able to attain enlightenment. The merit of chanting Daimoku is absolutely infinite and immeasurable.***

Visit Myosenji Buddhist Temple SAT Mar 7th

This Saturday our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe will give a brief lecture on the Buddhist Concept of the Ten Worlds. He will explain why Buddhist chanting is superior to meditation and how it brings joy to your life.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 entrance on Burnett Ave

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Saturday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

*Excerpted: Gosho, “On the Six Difficult and Nine Easy Acts”
**Daimoku – chanting of Nam Myoho Renge Kyo
***Excerpted: High Priest Nichinyo Shonin, July 9, 2009.

When facing the Gohonzon, our eyes should be fully open. We should steadily gaze at the character “Myo,” the third Chinese character from the top in the main inscription down the center of the Gohonzon.

If you have difficulty recognizing it, look at the very first Chinese character on page one of The Liturgy of Nichiren Shoshu (Gongyo book). This is the very same character Myo.

“Single-mindedly, with hands together in reverence, they respectfully gazed up at the World-Honored One, without lowering their eyes even for a moment.”

A passage in the Juki chapter of the Lotus Sutra

“The most vital thing is to chant Daimoku* with the correct posture, reverently looking at the Gohonzon with your eyes wide open. If your eyes wander here and there, or your body is crooked, or you hold your hands in a slipshod manner, that is proof that you are already losing the spirit of Buddhist practice.”

Sixty-seventh High Priest Nikken Shonin

*Daimoku means chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo.

Karma Introductory Lecture

Our Chief Priest will lecture about Karma this Sunday, March 1st. Rev Sakabe will teach us about Karma and the most important relationship we can have in this lifetime — our relation with the Buddha, the Gohonzon.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public and free.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 entrance on Burnett Ave

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Sunday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

26th High Priest, Nichikan Shonin stated:
A circle of beads manifests the mystic principle. Miao-lo stated in his writing The Annotations on the Great Concentration and Insight: “There is no lack in the mystic principle.” Therefore, we use a circle of beads that compares to the mystic principle. The basic number of beads is 108, which is said to represent the number of earthly desires possessed by common mortals. (excerpted Nichiren Shoshu Basics of Practice page 49)

Nichiren Shoshu Buddhists use prayer beads, called Juzu, as part of our daily practice of chanting and Sutra recitation (called Gongyo). At our Introduction meetings, our Chief Priest explains how earthly desires, karma and our sufferings block our path to happiness. He also explains what the Buddhist beliefs and symbolism of the prayer beads and why we use them.

Sunday – Lecture on Buddhism’s Beliefs

Visit our Buddhist Temple this Sunday, February 23rd, for a brief video presentation and lecture by our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Have a Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 entrance on Burnett Ave

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Sunday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

This single Law that is Myoho-Renge encompasses within it all the phenomena comprising the Ten Worlds and the three thousand realms, and is lacking in none of them. Anyone who practices this Law will obtain both the cause and the effect of Buddhahood simultaneously.

written by Nichiren Daishonin, 13th century Japan

This week in the United States many are celebrating Valentine’s Day. It is a festival of love and gift-giving. In Buddhism, love and relationships are best explained from the perspective of the Ten Worlds, a core Buddhist belief. Having loving and meaningful social relationships is key to our happiness. Yet, love is part of the Lower Six Paths and causes us suffering and pain.

The Ten Worlds categorizes the life conditions that we humans possess and experience daily. The Lower Six Paths are filled with our delusions. We perform the Buddhist practice of chanting Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and sutra recitation to free ourselves from the cycle of delusion. By doing so, we can attain the life conditions of the four noble worlds — particularly Buddhahood (enlightenment).

Love, Relationships and Delusions

Our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe, will be lecturing on the meaning of the Buddhist concept of the Ten Worlds this Sunday, February 16th. Please join us to learn how you and youre relationships are impacted by the Ten Worlds and how you can use this understanding to live a happy life.

  • Brief lecture by Chief Priest on the Buddhist Concept of the Ten Worlds
  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 entrance on Burnett Ave

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Sunday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

Buddhism is different from other religions, philosophies, and moral codes of conduct. It surpasses such teachings and is revered because it explains the importance of taking action through practice, based on the three categories of body, mouth, and mind. It also explains the means to expiate negative karma, attain enlightenment, and actualize a peaceful and tranquil society. 

Myoko Magazine, January 2011

How you feel about others plays a large role in how you make decisions. Medical research reveals that when bad feelings like envy, hatred, and anger occur, poisonous substances are released into the body that have a destructive effect on the cells of various organs. Ill feelings such as enmity and envy even destroy a person’s health.

In what circumstances do we develop ill feelings toward others?  Bad feelings may arise when we are insulted, ignored, or treated coldly; when our explanations are not listened to, or our value is not recognized; when our contribution is not evaluated fairly; when we are misunderstood or slandered; when our expectations are not met; or when we are misjudged (even if we are respected).

In short, when someone has an unfair attitude toward you or mistreats you, bad feelings toward that person can turn into hatred, jealousy, contempt, or grudges. What you need to focus on here is that this tendency arises from being strongly fixated on the “self.”

Buddhism teaches that one’s attachment to the idea that “the self equals the ego” is an incorrect view, and strongly urges people to get rid of that idea, since it is an illusion of thought. Ill feelings like hatred and jealousy actually arise out of a type of illusion of thought called egocentric views. The initial teachings of Buddhism placed strong emphasis on the eradication of illusions of thought and desire, including egocentric views.

Visit SAT February 8th – Karma Lecture

Our Chief Priest will lecture about Karma and relationships this Saturday, February 8th. If you are looking to become (or stay) a person with strong, positive relationships with others, start your Buddhist practice.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public and free.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901 entrance on Burnett Ave

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Sunday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

Excerpted: Nichiren Shoshu Monthly magazine, How to Overcome Bad Feelings Toward Others, May, 2007