Special Introductory Lecture – Hallendale Beach, FLORIDA SAT April 21st

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Everyone has desires of some sort, and may even have many desires. What a person yearns for the most, and how strongly he or she struggles to obtain it, says a lot about that person’s approach to life.

No matter how strong the spirit to seek, as long as what is sought is confined to things like wealth, power, acclaim, position, health and the like (in other words, as long as the desires are for “treasures of the storehouse” or “treasures of the body”) it has no relation to what is known in Buddhism as a “seeking mind.” A yearning cannot be called a “seeking mind” unless what you are seeking is at least to improve your character, achieve growth as a human being, or aim for a more elevated way of life.

Karma & Your Relationships

Visit Myosenji Temple this Sunday, April 22nd, for a brief lecture on Karma and how your desires and yearnings can block your path to happiness. Our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe, will explain Buddhism’s view of healthy relationships and how to turn your desires into motivation to change your karma.

  • Brief lecture by Chief Priest on the Buddhism’s Concept of Karma
  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts Sunday, April 22nd at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist, immediately following the meeting.

Excerpted: Nichiren Shoshu Monthly magazine, Maintaining a Seeking Mind, October, 2007

Suffer what there is to suffer, enjoy what there is to enjoy. Regard both suffering and joy as facts of life and continue chanting Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo, no matter what happens.

written by Nichiren Daishonin, 13th century Japan

Both suffering and pleasure are unavoidable in real life. The way to actualize the Middle Path between suffering and pleasure is by not trying to easily avoid sufferings when visited by them, nor becoming too indulgent in pleasures, even while enjoying them. That is the true practice of the Middle Path.

The fundamental meaning of the term “Middle Path” is to walk the indivisible middle way, not only unswayed by such extremes as suffering and pleasure, existence and void, or impermanence and eternity, but also based on correct Buddhist wisdom, which comprehends that all things manifest and become extinct because of causal relationships.

Buddhism’s Ten Worlds

Sunday, April 15th, our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe will briefly lecture on the Ten Worlds. He will explain why and how the Buddhist practice of chanting lets you control sufferings in your life, like too much or too little anxiety, by acquiring the wisdom of the Buddha.

  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.
  • 310 University Blvd West, Silver Spring, MD 20901

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Saturday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.

Excerpted: Nichiren Shoshu Monthly, The Middle Path, 1995.