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Buddhism’s 10 Worlds: Heaven & Hell Exist in You

At times he is joyful; at other times, he is enraged. Sometimes, he is calm, and sometimes, he manifests greed. At times he exhibits foolishness, and at times he reveals a distorted mind. Rage represents the world of hell; greed characterizes the worlds of hunger. Foolishness is the world of animality, and a distorted mind is that of anger. Joy signifies rapture, and calmness demotes humanity. These six paths all exist in the physical appearance of his face. The four noble worlds are dormant, and are not revealed in his face. However, a careful search would show that actually they are there.

written by Nichiren Daishonin in 13th century Japan

The principle of the ten worlds is a way to categorize the life conditions that we possess. We perform the Buddhist practices to free ourselves from the cycle of delusion. By doing so, we can attain the life conditions of the four noble worlds — particularly Buddhahood.

Buddhism’s Ten Worlds Lecture

Our Chief Priest, Rev Sakabe, will be lecturing on the meaning of the Buddhist concept of the Ten Worlds this Sunday, August 27th. Please join us to learn how you are impacted by the Ten Worlds and how you can use this understanding to live a happy life.

  • Brief lecture by Chief Priest on the Buddhist Concept of the Ten Worlds
  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, after Sunday’s meeting (about 3:30 pm) Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist.