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Buddhism: Be the Master of Your Mind

“…there was a battle between King Zhou of Yin with his 700,000 soldiers and King Wu of Zhou with his 800. King Zhou was defeated due to disunity, whereas King Wu won because of unity. An individual at odds with himself will not achieve anything, because his heart is not dedicated to a single purpose.”

written by Nichiren Daishonin in 13th century Japan

The following is a poem written by a Buddhist in olden times:

One’s mind is, indeed, a mind that bewilders the heart.
The mind works on the heart — do not relax your guard on your mind.

This poem explains that the mind of enlightenment and that of delusion coexist in our hearts. It eloquently expresses how these two minds conflict with each other. The first part, “one’s mind, indeed,” describes a deluded mind, and the next “mind” indicates an enlightened mind. The third mention of the “mind” refers once again to a mind of delusion.*

Be the Master of Your Mind

Visit Myosenji Temple this Saturday, September 9th, to learn how the Buddhist practice of chanting can make you the master of your own mind.

  • Brief video presentation and lecture by Chief Priest on the Buddhism’s Beliefs & Origins
  • Learn how to chant Nam Myoho Renge Kyo and properly use the Juzu Beads, Buddhist prayer beads.
  • Q&A with our Chief Priest.
  • The meeting starts at 2:00 pm and concludes around 3:15 pm. Open to the public.

If you have decided to become a Buddhist or are interested in learning how to become a Buddhist, Rev Sakabe will be performing the Acceptance of the Precept Ceremony, the ceremony where you become a Buddhist, immediately following the meeting.

 

Excerpted: Nichiren Shoshu Monthly magazine, “Life Manifesting the Ten Worlds,” January, 2014, p.6.